October 2020

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01
Oct
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Village Won’t Budget Body Cams for 2021

CROSS PLAINS–There will be no money in next year’s Village of Cross Plains budget for police body cameras.

The body camera question came up unexpectedly Monday as the village board neared completing work on the 2021 budget. 

Police Chief Tony Ruesga said more study is needed before any funds should be allocated.

“I know the body camera issue has come to the forefront and is highly talked about in today’s world and I’m interested in working on it,” he told the board.

A system compatible with the police department’s other communication equipment is currently being updated by the manufacturer and will need a few months to “get the bugs out,” Ruesga said.

“It will come with a price and (take) some time, and we’ll need to have training on it and the proper policies in place, which includes Open Records (requests),” he said.

Thu
01
Oct
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Elm Lawn Garden Certified as Monarch Waystation

MIDDLETON–The garden at Elm Lawn Elementary has been a collaboration between parents, students, staff and the Plant Dane Native Plant Program, and now the space has been certified a Monarch Waystation by Monarch Watch.

Elm Lawn parent Nicole Westphal, and the PTO re-envisioned the space that first became a garden in the 1990s as a Girl Scout Gold Project. Over the years it was also a BSA Eagle Scout project and has fluctuated back and forth from being a vegetable garden to an ornamental garden, even sitting idle for a while. Now the space is home to vegetables, herbs and perennial, annual and native plants.

Thu
01
Oct
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Richard E. “Dick” Williamson

MIDDLETON / TOWN OF SPRINGFIELD–Richard E. "Dick" Williamson, a witness to much of his beloved country's history, passed away on Sept. 24, 2020. Born in Dayton, OH, on Aug. 15, 1928, Dick had to get away from his hometown to discover his love of aviation. He attended elementary school and graduated from Fairview High School in Dayton in 1946, but it was the summer of 1945 when he convinced himself there was a big old world out there and he wanted to be more than just a spectator. Having hitchhiked across the country with one of his boyhood buddies that summer, Dick found himself high in the mountains of Idaho, manning a US Forest Service fire lookout on Clark Mountain where he spotted many Japanese "Fire Balloons” launched by submarine and intended to cause massive forest fires in the US. It was there that on Aug. 15, 1945, he celebrated his 17th birthday and heard the news of the Japanese surrender ending World War II.

Thu
01
Oct
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Francis “Frank” O’Connor

Francis “Frank” O’Connor

Thu
01
Oct
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Jeanne Demergian

MIDDLETON–Jeanne Demergian, nee Betty Jeanne Boeing, passed away peacefully on Sept. 25, 2020 at her home in Middleton, after a lengthy illness bravely borne, with family at her side.

Jeanne was born on July 17, 1929 in Woodstock to Edgar and Alice (Ferguson) Boeing. She grew up on a farm in Richland County, where, as a small girl, she harnessed the big horses that helped work the farm, and where her inseparable playmate was a pony named Chief. While attending Richland Center High School, Jeanne played the French horn and also played piano and sang in a trio. She loved cheerleading, especially at football games, and she became a lifelong Packers fan.

Thu
01
Oct
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Importance of In-Person Interaction

Our daughter’s desk collapsed on her the other day, pinning her to the ground in a pile of rubble consisting mostly of magic markers, erasers and books of a most considerable heft. 

We had had to fashion an office for her, when it became clear there would not be in-person classes. Desks, my wife informed me, were sold out everywhere. So, after a little thought and a lot of rummaging, we repurposed an old piece of furniture whose provenance and initial intent is a mystery to me. It looks kind of like an inebriated table, an emaciated desk or a postmodern bureau. 

Thu
01
Oct
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RBG

Ruth Bader Ginsburg (RBG) was a champion for human rights, those of women, minorities and the LBGT community. She was one of a small handful of women accepted at Harvard Law School in the early 1960s before transferring to Columbia Law School, something that was unheard of at the time.

I was 26 years old when she was appointed to the Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS), and remember it was a big deal because she was only the second female Supreme Court Justice and the first female Jewish justice. At that time, she was considered a moderate, and had previously been appointed to an appeals court in the District of Columbia by President Jimmy Carter. As the SCOTUS shifted to the right, she became a more liberal voice on the court and would often dissent.

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Oct

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